Comic Book Legends Revealed #632

Welcome to the six hundred and thirty-second in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Did an Airport Comic Purchase Change Batman History?

Which Hero Almost Didn’t Last Past Giant-Size X-Men #1?

Which Marvel Rival Was the ORIGINAL ‘Brand Echh’?

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #631

Welcome to the six hundred and thirty-first in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Was It Almost Rogue/LOKI Instead of Rogue/Magneto?!

Did ‘Stark Wars’ Become ‘Armor Wars’ Due to Star Wars?

An ‘X-Men’ Style New Titans Spin-Off?!

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #630

Welcome to the six hundred and thirtieth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Was There Nearly a Wonder Woman Abortion Story in 1973?

The Bizarre Spider-Man/Looter ‘Battle’ of 1966

The Accidental Sailor Mars/Martian Manhunter Connection

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #629

Welcome to the six hundred and twenty-ninth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Was Rogue Originally Meant to be Middle-Aged?

Was There Nearly a Captain America/Jenny Sparks X-Over?

Did a Comic Writer Defraud a Bunch of Famous Writers?

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #628

Welcome to the six hundred and twenty-eighth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

What Did Mary Jane REALLY Say to Mephisto?

Were Saved by the Bell’s Origins Within a Comic Book?

What Secret Wars Reference Was Cut From a Spidey Comic?

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #627

Welcome to the six hundred and twenty-seventh in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Which Creator Left Marvel Rather Than Write Married Spidey?

Was Mystique Going to be Rogue’s FATHER?

The Neil Gaiman Batman Story That Never Was

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Comic Book Legends Revealed #626

Welcome to the six hundred and twenty-sixth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

Was Mystique Going to be Rogue’s ACTUAL Mom?

What Happened to Jim Lee’s Punisher/Fury Graphic Novel?

Was There Nearly an Alan Davis Batman/Judge Dredd?

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Is “Everyday is a Winding Road” About Suicide?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends about music and whether they are true or false. Click here to view an archive of the movie urban legends featured so far.

MUSIC URBAN LEGEND: Sheryl Crow wrote the song “Everyday is a Winding Road” about the suicide of former Crowded House drummer, Paul Hester.

Rock and roll history is filled with songs that at first appear to be upbeat but then you listen to the lyrics and realize that they are actually pretty depressing, with Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the U.S.A.” being one of the most famous examples of that type of thing.

So if you were to learn that Sheryl Crow’s upbeat pop song, “Everyday is a Winding Road” was about suicide, it probably would not surprise you all that much…

However, just like there are lots of rock and roll songs with lyrics that don’t match their melody, so, too, are there lots of interviews with rock and roll singers where the origins of their songs get sort of jumbled up. When you show up to discuss a career that has lasted more than two decades, sometimes details get a bit blurred.

This was the case recently when Sheryl Crow went on the Howard Stern Radio Show to promote her latest album, Be Myself…

On the official Howard Stern website, they do recaps of their episodes, and they described the discussion of Crow’s hit 1996 song, “Everyday is a Winding Road” as follows:

Sheryl wrote “Everyday Is a Winding Road” about Crowded House drummer Paul Hester who committed suicide shortly after Sheryl and her band started opening for them on tour. The mixer on Sheryl’s second album insisted she include the track due to its subject matter. As a single, it hit No. 11 on the charts and was later covered by Prince.

The song was, indeed, about Paul Hester, the longtime drummer for the Split Enz and then Crowded House…

However, it was NOT about his suicide. It was about him quitting Crowded House in the middle of their 1994 USA tour (where Crow was their opening act). Hester told lead singer Neil Finn (at least Neil Finn says that he said this) that “every day is a winding road, mate, it’s time for me to veer off.” Hester was feeling anxious about touring and leaving behind his newborn baby daughter. So he quit the group.

Crow then wrote the song about Hester’s restless energy. Hester’s daughter was named Sunday, so it is likely the inspiration for the line in the song, “He’s got a daughter he calls Easter, she was born on a Tuesday night.”

In any event, ELEVEN YEARS after he left the tour and NINE years after the release of the song, Hester did, in fact, take his own life. However, that obviously had nothing to do with the original song, which really IS as upbeat as it sounds.

The legend is…

STATUS: False

Thanks to my wife for mentioning this after listening to Crow on the Stern show.

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future urban legends columns! My e-mail address is [email protected]

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May 3rd, 2017 | Posted in Music Urban Legends Revealed | No Comments

Did Johnny Carson Copy the Famous “Pretend to Eat a Potato Chip from a Potato Chip Collector” Gag from David Letterman?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends about TV and whether they are true or false. Click here to view an archive of the TV urban legends featured so far.

TV URBAN LEGEND: Johnny Carson stole the “pretend to eat a potato chip from a potato chip collector” routine from David Letterman.

Johnny Carson was famous for having guests on the Tonight Show who weren’t necessarily celebrities, but were just interesting people for whatever reason. Even when the show reduced in length from an hour and a half (and therefore they had much less time for guests, so they no longer had on the authors that they used to have on as the final guest of the night) they made sure to keep these non-celebrity guests on the show. They gave the Tonight Show a certain sort of charm. Especially since Carson also famously did not mock these people. He treated them like regular guests, although, of course, he knew that doing so would make the AUDIENCE laugh, but it is important to note that Carson played these interviews straight.

That is why, when Carson actually pulled a little gag on one of these guests, it stood out so much. People weren’t used to Carson messing with a regular person (Carson would, of course, would pull pranks on his celebrity friends, but not a “civilian”). It was more something that you would see on Late Night with David Letterman.

And that, in fact, is what led to a legend involving one of the few times that Carson DID mess with a regular person.

In October 1987, Carson had on Myrtle Young, who worked at a potato chip factory checking the quality of the chips. She would then collect the irregular potato chips as part of her collection and so she went on the Tonight Show to show off her treasures and at one point, Carson’s sidekick, Ed McMahon, distracted Young and while her back was turned, Carson pretended to eat one of her chips…

Her reaction really sold it. Such shock! But then Carson consoled her and she totally laughed at the situation and it was all good. A classic TV movement.

However, a lot of folks over the years noted that Young actually made her FIRST late night debut on Late Night with David Letterman, and many remember Letterman doing the same thing! I’ve seen it in a few different places, but here’s from the YouTube comments of the Carson clip…

As I recall, she was first on Late Night with David Letterman. Letterman did the exact same joke, eating a random potato chip pretending it was one of hers. I always wondered if Carson called Letterman and asked if he could use that joke, or if they just ripped it off altogether. I wish the Letterman interview with her were online.

I, too, was obviously curious about this, so I asked the greatest resource for David Letterman clips known to man, Don Giller, and he found the original Letterman clip and posted is so that we could see that no, Letterman did not do the “pretend to eat a potato chip from a potato chip collector’s collection” routine before Carson.

Therefore, the legend is…

STATUS: False

Thanks a lot, Don!

Everyone, feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is [email protected]

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May 2nd, 2017 | Posted in TV Urban Legends Revealed | No Comments

Comic Book Legends Revealed #625

Welcome to the six hundred and twenty-fifth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Each part of this week’s legends has their own link.

The Secret Origin of X-23?

Which Teen Titan Was Created as a Supergirl Fill-In?

How Was Namorita Going to Return in New Warriors?

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