Comic Book Legends Revealed #473-474

Here is a collection of Comic Book Legends Revealed from the last two weeks.

Click on any one to go to that column!
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #460-472

Here is a collection of Comic Book Legends Revealed from the last few months.

Click on any one to go to that column!
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #459

Welcome to the four hundred and fifty-ninth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. This week, did Superman comics help Allied spies during World War II? How did the British version of G.I. Joe deal with their properties being merged in the 1980s? And did Marvel have to pulp an entire print run of a comic because they didn’t get clearance from the licencors before printing began?

Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and fifty-eight.

Click here to read this week’s legends.

Was Darth Vader Not Originally Luke Skywalker’s Father in Empire Strikes Back?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends about movies and whether they are true or false. Click here to view an archive of the movie urban legends featured so far.

MOVIE URBAN LEGEND: Darth Vader was not originally Luke Skywalker’s father in The Empire Strikes Back.

Earlier this month, comedy writer Michael Schur, showrunner of Parks and Recreation and co-creator of Brooklyn 99, had an amusing tweet poking at a little bit of a plot hole in the Star Wars films:

“Owen, you must hide this baby, at all costs, from Anakin Skywalker.”
“Okay. Should we continue to call him Luke Skywalker?”
“Seems fine.”

The reason that that plot point did not exactly make sense was because originally Anakin Skywalker was not Darth Vader. It is fairly well known among even casual Star Wars fans that George Lucas’ original plans for “The Star Wars” were drastically different from what made it into the first film. This is the basis for Dark Horse Comics’ current mini-series The Star Wars, which is based on George Lucas’ original draft of the Star Wars story. However, as it turns out, there were still drastic changes to be made in Lucas’ plans for the films even after the first film, all the way up through the original screenplay for The Empire Strikes Back.

Read on to learn how the tragic death of a Sci-Fi legend might have re-shaped the Star Wars universe forever!
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #458

Welcome to the four hundred and fifty-eighth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. This week, learn how the Supergirl movie gave us the Supergirl headband costume, without using it themselves! Did Return of the Jedi lead to Jack Kirby changing the ending of his Fourth World Saga? Plus, does Alan Moore use a strict word limit per panel since he began working on American comic books?

Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and fifty-seven.

Click here to read this week’s legends.

Was Monopoly Once Ruled a Generic Term and Thus Not Protected by Trademark?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends related to board games and whether they are true or false.

BOARD GAME URBAN LEGEND: Monopoly was once ruled a generic term and un-trademarkable.

As noted in the last Board Game Urban Legend, Parker Brothers had a specific version of the history of Monopoly that went pretty much unchallenged until the mid-1970s, when aa San Francisco State University economics professor named Ralph Anspach attempted to sell a game called Anti-Monopoly.

Here is a second edition of Anti-Monopoly…

Parker Brothers tried to stop him, and in the long legal squabble that ensued (which Anspach took all the way to the Supreme Court!), the history of Monopoly was finally brought to light.
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Was Mel Blanc, the Voice of Bugs Bunny, Allergic to Carrots?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends about movies and whether they are true or false. Click here to view an archive of the movie urban legends featured so far.

MOVIE URBAN LEGEND: Mel Blanc, the voice of Bugs Bunny, was allergic to carrots.

Mel Blanc was a famed voice actor, known for voicing many famous characters in many different cartoons over his career, which spanned parts of six decades! Besides being one of the most prolific voice actors ever (his tombstone features his well-earned nickname, “The Man of 1000 Voices”), he is also likely the most acclaimed voice actor of all-time. In other words, he wasn’t just prolific, he was good.

However successful Blanc was the man of 1000 voices, though, one voice in particular is still his best known role (which is saying a lot for a guy who voiced such famous characters as Porky Pig, Daffy Duck and Barney Rubble), and that is his performance as the voice of Bugs Bunny, the most popular character from the extremely popular Looney Tunes film shorts from Warner Brothers during the 1930s through the 1960s (Bugs himself debuted in 1940′s A Wild Hare).

Blanc was the voice behind Bugs Bunny for almost fifty years, from Bugs’ debut right up until Blanc’s death in 1989. So for a guy whose most famous role was a rabbit, it’d be pretty darn funny if he was allergic to carrots, right? That’s the legend surrounding Mel Blanc and Bugs Bunny, that Blanc was actually allergic to carrots. Is it true?
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Was Monopoly Invented as a Tool to Teach People the Evils of Capitalism?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends related to board games and whether they are true or false.

BOARD GAME URBAN LEGEND: Monopoly was created by Charles Darrow.

BOARD GAME URBAN LEGEND: The predecessor to Monopoly was created to demonstrate the teachings of Georgism.

For years, it has been basically a given that Charles Darrow created Monopoly. Heck, if you go to Parker Brothers’ official website for Monopoly, you’ll see on their history of Monopoly page…

It was 1934, the height of the Great Depression, when Charles B. Darrow of Germantown, Pennsylvania, showed what he called the MONOPOLY game to the executives at Parker Brothers. Can you believe it, they rejected the game due to “52 design errors”! But Mr. Darrow wasn’t daunted. Like many other Americans, he was unemployed at the time, and the game’s exciting promise of fame and fortune inspired him to produce the game on his own. With help from a friend who was a printer, Mr. Darrow sold 5,000 handmade sets of the MONOPOLY game to a Philadelphia department store. People loved the game! But as demand for the game grew, he couldn’t keep up with all the orders and came back to talk to Parker Brothers again. The rest, as they say, is history! In its first year, 1935, the MONOPOLY game was the best-selling game in America. And over its 65-year history, an estimated 500 million people have played the game of MONOPOLY!

While that is certainly TRUE, what is also true is that Darrow basically just re-named an existing game.

The history of Monopoly really begins in a very unlikely place – the philosophical theories of Henry George.


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Was the Score for the Amityville Horror Just the Rejected Score for the Exorcist?

Here is the latest in a series of examinations into urban legends about movies and whether they are true or false. Click here to view an archive of the movie urban legends featured so far.

MOVIE URBAN LEGEND: Lalo Schifrin re-used his rejected score for The Exorcist for The Amityville Horror.

Lalo Schifrin was the original composer for the score to 1973′s The Exorcist…

However, when his music for the film’s initial trailer were deemed too scary (mostly that it was too discordent), he was asked to tone down the music. Well, at least the studio THOUGHT they were telling him when they asked the director of the film, William Friedkin, to relay the message.

Friedkin hated the score, though, so he instead just fired Schifrin.

The Exorcist ended up using a variety of songs, notably including Mike Oldfield’s “Tubular Bells,” which had just been released the previous eyar.

Five years later, Schifrin did the score to the hit horror film, The Amityville Horror…

Since the release of The Amityville Horror, people have been asking/presuming that Schifrin re-used his rejected score for The Exorcist for Amityville.
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #457

Welcome to the four hundred and fifty-seventh in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. This week, did Northstar nearly get his own solo comic book by John Byrne over twenty years ago? Does Marvel own a trademark on the word “Marvel” in comic book titles? And how did Peter David celebrate the firing of a nemesis of his in the Star Trek licensing department?

Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and fifty-six.

Click here to read this week’s legends.